Guitar String Vibration

Posted by on 23rd November 2010 in 2002 Guitar Technical Matters

Have you observed guitar strings’ vibration when they are plucked? Plucking a guitar string while varying the pressure will produce different sounds. Why this happens?
Standing wave or stationary wave on guitar strings resulting from the interference between original waves their reflection. Wavelength of a standing wave can be observed from its node and knot. Standing waves have different amplitudes at each point. Maximum amplitude is called the node, while the zero amplitude or no deviation is called a knot.

Melde experiment showed that the load mass produces gravity or string tension. Tensioned strings are mathematically expressed as follows:
F = mg ……………………………………….. ………………….. 1)
with: F = tension strings (N)
m = mass of load (kg)
g = acceleration due to gravity = 9.8 m/s2
Wave frequency equal to the frequency source, whereas the rate is determined by the wave on the string tension and linear mass density of the strings. Mathematically the rate of wave on string expressed in the form of equation as follows:
v ^ 2 = F / μ ……………………………………. ……………………….. 2)
with: F = tension strings (N)
μ = mass per unit length strings (kg / m)
v = wave velocity in the string (m / s)

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